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  • The mas­ter class brings togeth­er the works of three authors on the same top­ic- a com­bi­na­tion of liv­ing mate­ri­als, sym­bol­iz­ing spring (flow­ers, leaves), with non-liv­ing mate­ri­als, which per­son­i­fy win­ter and snow (wax and flo­ral glue, sim­i­lar to it in tex­ture).

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    February dropsFlorist Kristi­na Gogelia In this com­po­si­tion, win­ter and spring seem to have met: a melt­ed can­dle (its height- twen­tycm, diam­e­ter- eightcm), which “depicts” a melt­ing win­ter, adorns a wreath of frag­ile, spring-like quiv­er­ing flow­ers. Can­dle prepa­ra­tion- a painstak­ing task: they set fire to the wick and wait until the upper part heats up and soft­ens. At the same time, wax of anoth­er already melt­ed can­dle is poured over its sides.- lay­er by lay­er. More­over, after apply­ing 2–3 lay­ers, you need to wait until they hard­en. Dec­o­ra­tive pins (1) are attached to the “belt”. Then, from thin wire and flow­ers that can live long enough, such as oncid­i­um, tiger orchid, ornithogalum, weave a gar­land and place it among the pins (2, 3). Oth­er mate­ri­als can be used for gar­lands- berries of hawthorn, hol­ly, snow­ber­ry, fern or spruce branch­es, wax flower (waxfl ower).

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    February dropsFlorist Sergey Malyuchenko Glass vas­es or ordi­nary glass­es are dec­o­rat­ed with “caps” resem­bling snow or ice melt­ed in the sun (1). To make such a decor, it is bet­ter to use “plas­tic” glue. Glue cap­sules are loaded with flo­ral guns (they are sold in many flower shops). When the gun is turned on, the glue is heat­ed, after which it is care­ful­ly poured over the edge of a vase or glass, and then wait­ed for it to hard­en. Paraf­fin- too frag­ile mate­r­i­al for such a decor, “caps” from it would crum­ble after the first touch. ATvas­es or glass­es are filled with water to the very top (2). ATtwo ves­sels are immersed in minia­ture can­dles, and in the oth­er two- dahlia flow­ers on very short stems (3), which gives the com­po­si­tion some intrigue. Dahlias can be replaced with large chrysan­the­mums- the mood will remain the same.

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    February dropsFlorist Vyach­eslav Ros­ka To make such a com­plex and large, about 70 cm highsee, the wax frame is not easy. To do this, first a square-shaped form­work is made from the boards and a ves­sel of a suit­able size is placed in the cen­ter (the form­work and the ves­sel are moist­ened with soapy water). Free space in the form­work is filled with wax. When it hard­ens, the ves­sel is tak­en out, and the form­work is removed. The wax frame is placed ver­ti­cal­ly, wil­low branch­es are ran­dom­ly placed in the cen­tral cav­i­ty, from which the bark is first removed. Totest tubes for plants (1) are attached to the branch­es, the leaves of the roy­al bego­nia and the flow­ers of the pha­laenop­sis orchid are immersed in them (2, 3). After about a week, the flow­ers will with­er, and then the dec­o­ra­tive fill­ing can be replaced. Mon­stera or stre­litzia leaves are also appro­pri­ate here, and in spring- ranun­cu­lus inflo­res­cences, mus­cari or even forc­ing daf­fodils.

    The edi­tors would like to thank Inte­ri­or Lav­ka and the Flow­ers in Details floristry school for their help in film­ing.

    • Source: Ideas for Your Home Magazine#147